The Chairman of non-profit organisation urges Nigerian youths to start mobilising to take over political power in 2023.

The Chairman of non-profit organisation, Anap Foundation, Atedo Peterside, has urged Nigerian youths to start mobilising to take over political power in 2023. The former Chairman of Cadbury Nigeria Plc condemned the attacks on the unarmed #EndSARS protesters at Lekki tollgate and condoled the youths and the families of victims. Atedo said on Friday, “2050 is for the youths of today. It is not for those in my generation. “We are talking about the future of Nigeria and it is for the youths. So, if things happened that get the youths to be disenchanted nationwide, then we are in trouble. “I think what happened on Tuesday, October 20, 2020, can be turned around because it was the event of that day that made those who had no interest in politics to wake up. “The best time to build a nation is when the youths who are in the majority, they are at least 60 to 65 per cent, have been awakened. The gentle giants move a nation forward. “The youths themselves have learnt some lessons from these incidents. You will be most effective when you link your demands with political activism. They should start getting their voter’s cards. Don’t wait for the last one month or two months because then your cards may fail to arrive. “There is no force more powerful than the youths in Nigeria in terms of voting. They should become politically active and send some messages. “Based on what happened, I came to the conclusion that the youths should plan to take their country back from 2023. I’m a democrat and I will not encourage anything that will subvert democracy. “You voted for some people and you have to see it through. Start planning now for the next election. Don’t let anybody tell you it is too early. “One powerful signal the youths can send is that they won’t support anybody who today is above the age of 60. If you all unite on that, I[…]

Read more

Wole Soyinka’s take on #EndSARS protest

Prof. Wole Soyinka, has called on governors in states where protests are against the Special Anti-Robbery Squad forced declaration of curfews to immediately demand the withdrawal of soldiers deployed by the Federal Government.  Wole Soyinka in a message on Wednesday from his residence in Abeokuta, Ogun State, titled, ‘DÉJÀ VU– In tragic vein,’ spoke on the backdrop of the reported killing of unarmed protesters by soldiers at the Lekki toll gate in Lagos on Tuesday night after a 24-hour curfew imposed on the state by Governor Babajide Sanwo-Olu. There have been peaceful protests across many states in the country against police brutality and the F-SARS, a unit in the Nigeria Police Force. The Nobel laureate said, “To the affected governors all over the nation, there is one immediate step to take: demand the withdrawal of those soldiers. Convoke town hall meetings as a matter of urgency. 24-hour curfews are not the solution. Take over the security of your people with whatever resources you can rummage. Substitute community self-policing based on local councils, to curb hooligan infiltration and extortionist and destructive opportunism. We commiserate with the bereaved and urge state governments to compensate material losses, wherever. “To commence any process of healing at all – dare one assume that this is the ultimate destination of desire?– the Army must apologise, not merely to the nation but to the global community – the facts are indisputable – you, the military, opened fire on unarmed civilians. There has to be structured restitution and assurance that such aberrations will not again be recorded. Then both governance and its security arms can commence a meaningful, lamentably overdue dialogue with society. Do not attempt to dictate — Dialogue!” Soyinka noted that he said in his message to youths at the Freedom Park 10th anniversary events on Saturday, October 17, 2020, that they brought fresh blood into tired veins. The playwright went further to say that it was a bliss indeed to be alive to watch youths[…]

Read more