Minister Of Women Affairs:11 States Yet To Domesticate Child Rights Act.

Mrs Pauline Tallen, the Minister of Women Affairs, on Tuesday, said that 11 states had yet to domesticate the Child Rights Act out of the 36 states in the country, which was passed into law in 2003. The Minister made said this during a public hearing in Abuja organised by the Senate Committee on Women Affairs on two bills: “Older Persons’ Rights and Privileges Bill 2020 and The Child Rights Act, 2003 Amendment Bill 2020”. Since her assumption into office, she has been working round in circle, reaching out to governors and members of the Houses of Assembly in the various states to ensure that the Act is domesticated in the states, according to Tallen. “But the good news is that we are making some progress. Out of the 36 states we now have 25 states that have domesticated the Act. “I’m still not too happy that we still have 11 states that are yet to domesticate the Act. “However, I’m reaching out. I just returned from an advocacy tour of some of the states and I’m still moving on until I cover the 11 states. “I have just returned from Adamawa, Bauchi, and Gombe. The three States I have visited since after the COVID-19 and they have reassured me because I addressed the Houses of Assembly of the three states and had public hearing with stakeholders.” The minister further guaranteed that before the end of 2020, all states would have domesticated the Act. She explained the two bills as life-saving bills which particularly has to deal with the Child Right Act having in mind the events that were unwrapping in the country as a result of rape and gender-based violence which affects innocent children that are vulnerable members of the society. “The old persons are not left out of it and it is heartbreaking that this vulnerable class has been so badly abused by evil men in our society.” “A former Senator representing Adamawa North Senatorial District called for[…]

Read more

“Fayose Will Face Trial After Leaving Office” – EFCC

The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), has yesterday, July 16th said that governor Ayodele Fayose of Ekiti State will face criminal trial after leaving office. Hours after Mr Fayemi was announced winner of the Ekiti election, the EFCC posted a tweet on its official Twitter handle that it would resurrect a poultry scandal involving the governor. The agency later deleted the tweet which was condemned by many Nigerians including the governor’s spokesperson. In a statement, the EFCC spokesperson played down on the tweet controversy, but said only the court could clear Mr Fayose of his criminal trial after leaving office. “While it is true that there is a subsisting criminal charge against Governor Fayose, the fate of the charge will be determined by the Federal High Court, Ado Ekiti, at the expiration of his tenure, not the EFCC,” the agency’s spokesperson, Wilson Uwujaren, said. Read the full EFCC statement by Mr Uwujaren below. The Economic and Financial Crimes Commission has observed with interest, reactions to a tweet that purportedly appeared on the Commission’s Twitter handle July 15, announcing the imminent revival of the criminal case against Governor Ayodele Fayose of Ekiti State. In the opinion of most commentators, the tweet coming a few hours after Fayose’s protege, Kolapo Olusola of the People’s Democratic Party lost the governorship election to his All progressives Congress rival, Kayode Fayemi, betrayed the partisanship of the EFCC in the political contest in Ekiti State. Against the background, Commission is constrained to state that the purported tweet does not represent the views of the EFCC. As a law enforcement organization the Commission is apolitical and was not involved in the recent Ekiti election. It therefore has no reason to gloat over the political misfortune of any candidate or political god-father. While it is true that there is a subsisting criminal charge against Governor Fayose, the fate of the charge will be determined by the Federal High Court, Ado Ekiti, at the expiration of his tenure,[…]

Read more